TLC2019 SPEAKERS

Keynote speaker:
ROBERT ETCHES

A dynamic actor in the language industry for 30 years, Robert Etches has worked with every aspect of it, achieving notable success as CIO at TextMinded from 2012 to 2017. Always active in the community, Robert was cofounder of the Word Management Group, the TextMinded Group and the Nordic CAT Group. He served four years on the board of GALA (two as chairman), and four on the board of LT-Innovate. In a fast-changing world, Robert believes there has never been a greater need to implement innovative initiatives. This has naturally led to his involvement in his most innovative challenge to date: As CEO of Exfluency he will be responsible for combining blockchain and language technology to create a linguistic ledger capable of generating new opportunities for freelancers, LSPs, corporations, NGOs and intergovernmental institutions alike.

Talk is cheap: Implementing real change and staying ahead of the disruption

A futurologist told me in early 2018 that there will be more technological change during the next ten years than the last 250. I replied that, as he was talking on behalf of a bunch of middle-aged Caucasian men, this was most probably a conservative estimate …

All very smart, very clever, but nevertheless very believable. And, if it is true, this means that by 2020 we are already two years into this ten-year cycle of technological change. Change, even disruption, is going to hit many industries hard and soon.

Question 1: Dare you bet on the status quo in the language industry remaining unchanged?

Question 2: If no, what steps can you take, as a linguist, an LSP, or as a corporate or public purchaser of multilingual services to ride the disruption and evolve rather than fall by the wayside?

I look forward to giving you food for thought and a list of “to dos”. Talk is cheap. It’s time to act.

Ioana Hristu

Jo Ioana Hristu is a Senior Partner Sales Executive for SDL Language Technologies and has worked with SDL since 2013. Her main focus is helping SDL Resellers develop their markets, promote SDL products and improve customer support.

 

Resellers are always her priority and her aim is to provide the best service and support at all times. She is enthusiastic and a very good net-worker, always ready to put all the energy and time to get the job done.

 

Her ability to listen and understand Reseller’s and clients' needs allows her to consult effectively.

Change Without Disruption

Details TBA.

Csilla Rostas

Csilla is a multilingual lawyer with extensive expertise in various fields of law. She moved to Brussels, to complete work experience within the European Parliament followed by working at an esteemed international law firm, specialising in business immigration law, ultimately translating that into starting her own business.

The ins and outs of specialising in legal translation

What is legal translation?
Specialisation - why to specialise in legal translation?
Challenges of legal translation
Legalisation of official documents in the EU
What is a sworn translation?
What is a legalized translation in Belgium?
Who is a sworn translator in Belgium?
When is it necessary to have a sworn translation?
Hague Apostille Convention
Procedural issues and consultation of interested parties - Public consultation
Internal consultation - EC
What is the problem of EU citizens and businesses?
What is the scale of the problem?
EU citizens, case example - a marriage between citizens from two Member States, cross-border use of civil status documents
EU businesses - case example
In which situations are these administrative formalities required?
Shortcomings of the Apostille Convention
Does the EU have the power to act? Legal basis - TFEU
Improved administrative cooperation between the Member States
Multilingual standard forms
Expected impact

Paula Ribeiro (with Tina Duarte)

•Master Degree in Specialised Translation and Interpreting from ISCAP (Instituto Politécnico do Porto)
•Freelance translator from English, French and Spanish to Portuguese since 1997, specialising in the vehicle, civil engineering, IT, power electronics and industrial robotics industries
•Organiser and speaker at national and international translation and interpreting conferences
•Creator and founder of the Crossingwords brand, a small translation and interpreting atelier
•Founder and President of APTRAD

Specialization, Recognition, Certification - the way to go!

It's a fact! 2020 is just around the corner, bringing with it a world of innovations that are changing the way translators and interpreters work. In an industry largely composed of freelancers, this rising evolution may seem too big to be properly absorbed and used in our favour. We believe that freelancers need to increasingly step up their continuing training and to have in-depth knowledge of the real needs and specific work requirements of their clients. All stakeholders involved in this work cycle need to work closely together, in particular the academy, companies, freelancers, unions and trade associations.
In the future, the trade associations, partners of excellence among all stakeholders, will have a leading role in consolidating our industry. We advocate the creation of professional bodies, offering specific and specialised training, mentoring programmes, internship pool, awareness-raising initiatives to the importance of our profession with business groups, which should contribute to strengthening the spirit of our class.

Nicolas Martin Fontana

I was born in Argentina in 1981, from a Spanish-Italian family. The roots of my family can be traced from my father side in Castile and León, in Spain, and from my mother side in Piedmont, Italy and Trieste (which nowadays is part of Italy but used to be a part of former Yugoslavia).  I joined the translation industry in Poland in 2011 as a member of a localization testing unit in a big localization company in Warsaw. After several roles there, I ended my career in the Language Lead position. As a Language Lead, I have to admit that I had the pleasure of working with the best team of people that I ever met in my life till now.

After that, I decided that it was high time to move back to Andalusia, where my brother and my closest friends are located.

Thanks to Jensen Localization I have the opportunity to be back in such a beautiful place.

Business models in the translation industry - Franchising

The franchising business model related to the translation industry was first used by Berlitz to expand their services. Nowadays Berlitz only offers language instruction and cross-cultural training but they are still using a franchise strategy as a business model.
Other translation and interpreting agencies like Lingua-World, CJS Translation Office, Iolante, and Jensen Localization offer franchising as a method for expansion and as a business model.
In this presentation we would like to give a general overview about how franchising could work in the translation industry.

Joanna Pawulska Saunders

Having qualified as a translator and interpreter from the Universities of Bath, Kent and Innsbruck, Joanna has spent over two decades as a professional linguist. While written translation has always been her first love, she has also worked as an interpreter, linguistic abstractor and teacher Nowadays, she focuses on translation full-time, translating from Polish, French and Germand into English, specialising in the lifestyle sector: food, wine, art, music and environmental matters.
In her spare time, Joanna is a Scout Leader, and likes to sing – sometimes even doing both at the same time. She is a great believer in the importance of community and mutual cooperation, and the cause closest to her heart is the alleviation of loneliness in old age.

Translation Slam - Man versus Machine

Details TBA.!

Kester Thompson

Kester Thompson originally hails from England, via North Wales. As a child of 2 English teachers, who also owned a bookshop, he never really have much of a chance at doing something that didn’t involve language and linguistics. Nevertheless, try he did, and after training to be an actor, he accidentally fell straight into a too-successful career in restaurants and bars, along with theatre and acting. For the next 20 years, he was doing one or all of these at any one time. But writing was always there. Plays, articles, menus, books, funding proposals, marketing communication, websites, you name it.

 

Ultimately, it turns out that cocktail recipes + writing = UX Text. Kester started as a freelancer for Wix, became a full-time UX writer in 2016 and is now a team lead.

Case study: How We Write for 150 Million Wix users in 20 Languages

Wix has over 150 million users in 190 countries across the world. The company employs over 100 writers covering a range of disciplines. UX text, marketing content, help articles, ADI content - all of these needs to be localized into 20 languages. I’ll be discussing how we approach this massive task, why we do it (almost) all in house, and how we handle getting 28 million words (give or take a few) into production. And why does Japan get its own checkout flow?

 

I’ll also be looking forward to where Wix is going with Localization. Constant technological advancement brings fresh challenges and opportunities. How can we make our UI truly global, and give every user a more tailored experience? And how do we work with new methods of engineering that are too advanced for our CMS? Come learn how a global company handles localization on a large-scale.

Agenor Hofmann-Delbor

PhD in Information Technology. Since 2003 actively participating in the translation industry, lecturing at universities, creating courses, guides and writing articles on CAT tools and software localisation. Consultant, certified trainer and deployment specialist. Founder of Localize.pl and the Translation and Localization Conference. His good track record covers a variety of roles: localisation engineer, software localisation tester, translator, trainer, IT department coordinator, project manager, business development director, sales director, book author, and a conference organiser, among others. After hours, a soul and blues musician.

Workshop: What’s really inside localization files?

A quick workshop on what’s hidden in several localization formats, what’s displayed on our screens, and how does that affect our daily work.

 

Topics covered:

- packages, archives: sdlppx, sdlrpx, docx, xlsx.

- how formatting and tags are embedded in typical files.

- fingerprints we tend to leave in our files: sdlxliff, preparation, analysis, using MT, comments.

- missing sting – hardcoded vs. externalized resources.

 

Workshop addressed to beginners and intermediate users of CAT tools.

Danuta Przepiórkowska

Danuta Przepiórkowska is a founding member of PSTK - the Polish Association of Conference Interpreters. Her working languages include Polish, Russian and English. Apart from being an active interpreter, translator and trainer, she has been closely following the developments in the interpreting profession as part of her academic activity. 

Interpreting in the 21st century: The challenges that lie ahead

During this slot, devoted exclusively to interpreting, we will consider various recent developments on the market, including technology and social factors, and try to predict their impact on the future of the interpreting profession and our own careers as interpreters. Based on a presentation and brainstorming in groups, workshop participants will consider their own professional profiles and identify ways to make themselves future-proof for the decades to come.

Jacek Mikrut

Graduated in economics from the University of Szczecin. Expert in CAT tools, certified trainer, experienced in troubleshooting all things SDL Trados. Author of SDL Trados manuals in Polish, as well as a number of courses and technical articles, mostly about SDL Trados. Co-director and capo bastone of Localize.pl. In the TLC Team, he takes care of our sponsors and partners.

All your SDL Trados Questions Answered – Q&A Session with a Certified SDL Trados Studio Expert

If you are not sure what to ask, here's some inspiration:

  • custom settings for specific file types (docx, xlsx, etc.),

  • use pseudo-translate while handling PDF files and avoid problems with target files

  • translate multi-lingual Excel files

  • use the “translate – review – sign-off” workflow

  • MultiTerm and custom fields

  • translation memories and custom fields

  • and more :)

The workshop is open to non-attendees of TLC2019 - price for the workshop alone is 75 EUR (VAT incl.). Enquire at: info@translation-conference.com.

Aaron Schliem

Aaron’s career in language services spans twenty years and includes roles as language instructor, translator, medical interpreter, cross-cultural communications consultant and localization executive. In his role as Chief Marketing Officer for Bureau Works, Aaron is bringing to market a localization operations platform designed to bring transparency and meaningful accountability to the daily work of translators and enterprise buyers of language services. Keeping him busy and honest on the side are Aaron’s two teenage daughters and his commitment to producing plays and events in support of local LGBTQ organizations.

Unconference

A meeting with a looser structure than a typical conference. The agenda and subject matter is decided upon by the participants. During our unconference, the "moderators" will be Ellen Singer of AzTech Solutions and Aaron Schliem of Idiosynch and Bureau Works - two natural facilitators who will make sure that the discussions are fruitful, enthusiastic and varied, using a variety of methods and configurations. 

What topics would you like to talk about at TLC unconference? Let us know in the Facebook survey! 

You can also e-mail us at info@translation-conference.com.

There will also be the possibility of adding topics during the first day of the conference on a special board.

Lennard van Uffelen

Lennard van Uffelen works as a (literary) translator from Russian, Polish and Ukrainian into his native Dutch. He studied philology at the universities of Amsterdam and Warsaw, and theoretical linguistics at Moscow's Higher School of Economics.

Machine Translating Poetry: Some prospects

Statistics based machine translation have in the last years greatly improved in quality. This innovation is heavily felt on the translator's market as well. An ever growing number of translators make use of CAT-tools. Some translation services go even further by switching to human-corrected machine translations alltogether, while others continue to shun machine translation, which they deem uncapable to correctly read and reproduce natural human style. The field of poetry, where style is the dominant, seems to be immune to this technological revolution. Some forrays, however, are being made, for instance by Google's AI lab, which in recent years published several experimental papers on the implementation of metre and rhyme in phrase-based machine translation tools. In my lecture, I will try to imagine the future of poetic machine translation.

Beata Strzałka

Beata Strzałka works as a Learning and Development Director at Sodexo, managing an international team spread across 8 countries. Her professional mission is to put vision into motion through innovative ideas while keeping both feet sound on the ground. As Strengths Coach she is deeply engaged in guiding individuals, teams and organizations towards their ambition for the future by challenging the status quo, brainstorming new ways of working and overcoming barriers on the way to reach their goals.
As a mother of two, she believes that a balance is a key to meaningful and happy live, so she passionately celebrates running, good books and photography, travels and hiking in the mountains.

Your future of work is... now

The way we work is changing fast, for various reasons like digitisation, social and economic forces and the innovation that the new generations are brining in. All of these and many more to come will define what the real future of work looks like.

With so many conflicting pressures it is not easy to make changes in our work today, even though we know that new skills are going to be necessary in the future of work.

Under these circumstances it is critical to make decisions based on jobs that are coming, not ones that have gone, using our innate talents as a guide.

Knowing that you're great at something offers genuine hope and opportunity to capitalize on our talents in that market.

Wojciech Froelich

Wojciech Froelich has 18 years of experience in localization engineering. He is CTO at Argos Multilingual where he leads a team of experienced engineers who are responsible for building customer-oriented localization workflows and providing internationalization consultancy and software engineering support to Argos partners. Wojciech focuses on integrating authoring, automated translation management and multilingual publishing systems.

DEBATE: Skills needed for 2020

With Areta Kempińska and Robert Etches, moderated by Agenor Hofmann-Delbor (TLC Team).

Areta Kempińska

Graduate of the Institute of English Studies and the American Studies Center at the University of Warsaw. Polish-English translator and interpreter since 1995. Since 2002 Areta has been a managing partner of Bireta where she coordinates the departments of translation, interpreting and project management. She specializes in developing long-term client relations and service quality assurance.

MT in the work of a translation agency and a freelance translator

We cannot deny that the popularity of machine translation grows at an astonishing rate. Machine translation is more and more often used by freelance translators as well as by Translation Service Providers. But do we have to be afraid that machines will take over our job?

 

What is the difference between SMT and NMT? What is post-editing? What are the regulations concerning MT? Do TSPs and freelancers go hand in hand? This presentation answers all these questions, shows facts and refutes myths about machine translation and cooperation beetween TSPs and freelancers.

Tina Duarte (with Paula Ribeiro)

•Master Degree in Translation and Interpretation from Instituto Politécnico de Leiria
•Freelance translator from English and French to Portuguese since 2006, specialised in Business, Marketing, Tourism and International Affairs
•Speaker at national conferences
•Co-organizer of the 2nd International APTRAD Conference
•Member of the Board of APTRAD

Specialization, Recognition, Certification - the way to go!

It's a fact! 2020 is just around the corner, bringing with it a world of innovations that are changing the way translators and interpreters work. In an industry largely composed of freelancers, this rising evolution may seem too big to be properly absorbed and used in our favour. We believe that freelancers need to increasingly step up their continuing training and to have in-depth knowledge of the real needs and specific work requirements of their clients. All stakeholders involved in this work cycle need to work closely together, in particular the academy, companies, freelancers, unions and trade associations.
In the future, the trade associations, partners of excellence among all stakeholders, will have a leading role in consolidating our industry. We advocate the creation of professional bodies, offering specific and specialised training, mentoring programmes, internship pool, awareness-raising initiatives to the importance of our profession with business groups, which should contribute to strengthening the spirit of our class.

Ellen Singer

Ellen Singer has been a technical translator for more than twenty years at AzTech Solutions, a small translation agency that provides a wide range of services. Although she specializes in technical translation and has used CAT tools since the nineties, Ellen’s interests and skills are far-ranging. She relishes the challenge of projects requiring creativity and rhyming skills, as well as transcreation projects, and she has spoken at translation conferences on a wide range of topics. Ellen and Enrico manage their business and three children together. Ellen collaborates with Dorota Pawlak to organize various workshops under the name All-Round Translator.

Unconference

A meeting with a looser structure than a typical conference. The agenda and subject matter is decided upon by the participants. During our unconference, the "moderators" will be Ellen Singer of AzTech Solutions and Aaron Schliem of Idiosynch and Bureau Works - two natural facilitators who will make sure that the discussions are fruitful, enthusiastic and varied, using a variety of methods and configurations. What topics would you like to talk about at TLC unconference? Let us know in the Facebook survey! You can also e-mail us at info@translation-conference.com.There will also be the possibility of adding topics during the first day of the conference on a special board.